Some Types Of Internet Security Threats

The world we are living in is making a fast evolution to digitize everything. Books, weight loss programs, music, even parties and classes are all now available online in digital form. Indeed, the technology for all these applications continues to innovate and grow exponentially fast.

Needless to say, with this raging growth in the online industry follows a rapidly increasing number of cyber security threats. As every aspect of our lives turns digital, we are in turn becoming more and more open to having our files compromised, our privacy violated, and our information stolen. Government and hackers alike are to blame, because Internet surveillance is now pervasive in almost every country, despite public protest over such bad measures.

There is a host of obvious threats to your Internet security and here’s what online users should watch out for.

Ransomware

Ransomware is a sickening form of malicious software, which infects victims’ computers, locks up all, or some documents and asks for payment in exchange for them to regain access. Cryptolocker – the most infamous example of ransomware – was earlier this year dealt as huge blow when several people were arrested by federal officials for allegedly being involved in the scam.

And, although that crackdown was a great step, Internet security experts say the software is still spreading and it is now moving to new soft targets. Intel’s McAfee Labs, has managed to track a rapidly rising number of ransomware attacks, especially on mobile devices.

Ransomware

Possibly scarier: Internet security experts generally recommend that people back up their data in order to avoid the pain of losing access to their documents and files, however, McAfee has warned that new ransomware strains might attempt to target securely stored login info for cloud backup service and lock up the files too.

Consider backing up your documents to external hard drives to avoid ransomware threats. Just like with many other kinds of malware, this one is also often unknowingly downloaded when consumers click on links or open email attachments.

However, if you at any one time you become a victim of ransomware attacks, please avoid the temptation of paying up. There is absolutely no guarantee the villains will actually free up your files, and funding Internet security crooks’ activities only worsens up the matter.

Malicious messages that certainly seem like the real thing

Cybercriminals mostly deliver malicious software or obtain personal information by tricking their victims with messages that really seem as legitimate. Download the attachment or click the link, and you have unintentionally infected your mobile device or computer.

Such malicious e-mails were once unsophisticatedly done: poor grammar, broken images, or other hints that the messages were not really coming from your mom or the bank. However, cybercriminals now have advanced increasingly and are now using toolkits’ at their disposal to help them build very truthful-looking malware and messages.

They can direct a tool at any website, say a school, and it scrapes the actual school site’s language, logo, language, everything. Internet security experts used to tell consumers to stay clear of things that look suspicious, but these advanced toolkits’ can trick even sensitive customers. It is all turning out to be a more professional game that is likely to hurt many Internet users globally.

It is a highly sophisticated spin on old attacks, and it’s worrying that consumers are always wrongfully assuming they shall be able to know any malicious e-mail. The best thing you can to do remain safe from this type of Internet security threat is by simply not clicking on links coming from any e-mail.

If that is really too extreme for you, then be sure to hover your mouse over hyperlinks ensure they are taking you to the site they claim to be. And, if it appears even remotely wrong or strange, do not click the link. Try to exercise extreme caution whenever you are dealing with any attachments as well.

Targeting the “one percent”

Although cybercriminals may target a particular government or company entity, they generally don’t spend much time targeting a single person because the possible financial pay-off is not worth their time. Nonetheless, wealthy consumers are the exception, according to a recent Internet security research carried out.

Cyber Crime

It is highly expected that cybercriminals will have a more active eye towards the wealthy – the one percent. If a criminal thinks he/she can get a serious amount of money from a victim, he/she can decide to spend a lot of time on a personalized attack.

Even if you are part of the 99%, Internet security experts warn that consumers must desist from giving out information like employers, birthdays, as well as other bio details on Facebook , Twitter, and other sites. Crooks can be devious about leveraging this info.

Cyberwar and Espionageware

What Internet security experts have been terming as a “Cyber Cold War” for quite some time is now ramping up very quickly. Indeed, many nations and states both strong and weak see cyber-attacks, as the best weapon to counter United States’ global influence.

Therefore expect an increase in malicious software being used by governments to spy on the activities of certain individuals. Amnesty International recently released an antispyware tool, which scans devices for surveillance software belonging to governments.

Overall, Internet security experts predict the number of cyber-attacks will go up in 2015 and beyond. It is scary stuff, but there is hope that public awareness and conversation will as well increase. Of course, that will not happen overnight, but in order to make changes a conversation will have to be started.

In the meantime, there are a handful of best practices that can protect average persons from a host of vulnerabilities likely to face them. First, ensure to keep your antivirus software always updated, never store sensitive personal info online or on e-mails, use strong passwords, never sign into accounts when using Wi-Fi networks that are public and exercise extreme caution when downloading attachments or clicking links.

Symantec’s 2015 Internet Security Threat Report: The Cyber Landscape

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=x5R34SXnRpk

Cyber attackers are being sophisticated than ever, moving faster and causing more damage. What are some of the biggest Internet security threats businesses are facing?

How To Avoid Getting Your Offline Device Hacked

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YmjjrQwXSVI

There is always a risk of security threats whenever your device is connected to the internet. However, there are also ways hackers can bring down your offline device.

Protect Your Smartphone Against Security Threats

As a smartphone user, you should take care of your device more than physically. It is of great importance to keep it from any concrete damage; however, what most users forget is, there are much more serious threats that they have to protect their smartphone from: hackers.

laptops and tabletsLike your wallet, your device contains private information including credit card and bank account numbers or other financial details. Due to the lack of internet security and anti-virus app installed on your smartphone, it is a vulnerable target for hackers other than computers, laptops and tablets. Once you’ve been caught off guard and your device has been infiltrated by hackers, they can either steal your personal information or infect your smartphone with viruses like malicious software or malware, which slows down any devices’ system and speed.

For you to effectively protect your smartphone as well as your personal data from the biggest internet security threats like hackers and scammers, you could carry out yourself the preventive measures below.

1. Get Internet Access through a Secure Wi-Fi Network

If you are one of those smartphone users who enjoy surfing the net while connected to a public Wi-Fi network, you’d better quit it because you put your device and its data at high risk of being hacked every time you do that. Wi-Fi networks that are not password-protected let hackers around your area snatch your data fast and easily whenever you get connected to them.

If you’re connected to an unsecured Wi-Fi network, it’s best you avoid doing any online shopping and banking transactions. Those data thieves can obtain any of your financial information once transactions have been completed while you get internet connection from a public Wi-Fi network. You should therefore make sure that your connection comes from a secure Wi-Fi network to avoid data theft and other internet security threats.

2. Install an Anti-virus AppSmartphone security

Whether you’re using an iPhone or an android phone, you can easily find an anti-virus app to protect your data upon checking your device’s app store. As a matter of fact, a simple free anti-virus app can be of great help to alert you to viruses that might be a gateway of hackers to collect private information. But if you really want to be complacent about the absolute internet security of your smartphone and data, you could find a lot of paid anti-virus apps at very reasonable prices.

3. Install Apps from Trusted Sources Only

A number of apps from untrusted sources carry viruses with them. And as stated earlier, viruses can be a means of hackers to infiltrate your phone and its data. To avoid these internet security threats, just simply get rid of apps that came from suspicious sources. You can easily identify whether an app is legit through reading reviews left by users, verifying its store’s legitimacy, or checking out the app creator’s official website.

4. Trash Text Messages from Unknown Senders

One of hackers’ ways to get into your smartphone is by sending text messages containing links. For instance, these data thieves write messages as if they’re from your bank that needs confirmation by clicking on links. Be very careful of this modus. Don’t open or click on the links as it’s possible that they might lead you to websites filled with viruses and internet security threats. Trash them immediately before you accidently open them.